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Neighborhoods zoned for Mixed...

Neighborhood Characteristics – Mixed Use Zoning

Neighborhoods zoned for Mixed Use allow both commercial and residential usage.  In other words, office buildings, storefronts, etc. can exist side-by-side with homes. 

On the surface, many people might think Mixed Use zoning is a negative for a homeowner with a home for sale or a homebuyer hoping to buy a home.  After all, who wants their new home located in the middle of a bunch of commercial real estate with the associated noise and traffic?  Surprisingly, that is not the case.

Mixed Use zoning is actually intended to create small, self-contained communities.  That is, a neighborhood where people live close to their offices, can walk to grocery stores, etc.

In fact, Mixed Use zoning is a key aspect of what is known as the “New Urbanism” movement in architecture and neighborhood planning.

Mixed Use is frequently used in condominium complexes.  A condominium building might have a large first floor with offices, retail shops and cafes while higher floors are residential units.

Mixed Use, in real estate sales, is a mixed blessing.  Some homebuyers may be put off by the commercial hustle and bustle when looking for homes to buy.  Others might appreciate the convenience of being able to walk to dining, shopping or even work. 

A homeowner hoping to sell a home, or a homebuyer hoping to buy a home should talk to their realtor when dealing with Mixed Use real estate. A good realtor, like the ones here at bealocaldestin.com, can give you a full list of the pros and cons of Mixed use real estate.

Disclaimer:

The material on our website is intended to provide only general information and comments as a courtesy to the general public and potential real estate clients. Although we make our best efforts to ensure that the information found on our website is accurate and timely, we cannot, and do not, guarantee that the information is either. Nor do we guarantee the accuracy of any information contained on websites to which our website provide links.

Do not, under any circumstances, rely on information found on our website as a replacement for sound professional advice from individuals who specialize in such matters. Legal, insurance, and other related subjects are often complicated. For assistance with your specific real estate questions or inquiries please contact one of our knowledgeable real estate agents, any of whom will be pleased to determine whether our agency can assist you.

A few weeks back,...

Not Using a Realtor can Be a Costly Proposition

A few weeks back, we posted an article discussing why you should use a realtor when buying a home. This got us to thinking about the main reasons people refuse to use a realtor in their home buying or home selling process.

“I can do it all myself, they say.”  How many times have you heard that one?  Especially, when it comes to using a realtor to buy a home or sell a home.

The biggest reason, it seems, that people don’t want to use realtors is the commission.  For some reason, people who either want to buy a home for sale or sell a home just cannot stand the idea that the realtor should be paid for the work that they do. 

Sometimes the buyer of the home for sale or the owner doesn’t understand the amount of work that goes into putting a property sale together.  The marketing, the showings, the negotiations, arranging the appraisal, arranging the inspection, coordinating financing…realtors put in a lot of time and effort which you would otherwise have to do.

Other times, they think they can get a better deal (either a lower price for a homebuyer or more money in the pocket for a home seller) if the commission is not a factor.  It rarely turns out that way in real life.  Sellers don’t lower their prices to reflect the lack of commission, they just start thinking about the extra money they’ll get. 

Of course we are extremely biased, but we take pride in what we do on behalf of our clients. It's not the easiest of processes and more often than not, handling things "by owner" or yourself costs you extra time, money, and valuable sales assistance. Do yourself a favor…stick to a professional realtor.

 

Disclaimer:

The material on our website is intended to provide only general information and comments as a courtesy to the general public and potential real estate clients. Although we make our best efforts to ensure that the information found on our website is accurate and timely, we cannot, and do not, guarantee that the information is either. Nor do we guarantee the accuracy of any information contained on websites to which our website provide links.

Do not, under any circumstances, rely on information found on our website as a replacement for sound professional advice from individuals who specialize in such matters. Legal, insurance, and other related subjects are often complicated. For assistance with your specific real estate questions or inquiries please contact one of our knowledgeable real estate agents, any of whom will be pleased to determine whether our agency can assist you.

 

 

 

One of the best...

What is Real Estate Broker?

One of the best ways to think about a real estate broker is as the “employer” of real estate agents (or realtors).  While the relationship is not quite the same as employee-employer, it is analogous.

In general, most states require that realtors perform their duties under the license of a broker.  So the broker opens up an office, then realtors go to work as a part of that office.

There are a complex set of laws and regulations that state's use to define exactly what a broker can do when representing the owner of a home for sale or the buyer hoping to purchase a home.  To further complicate matters, those rules vary—sometimes greatly—from state to state.

The broker generally starts off as a realtor then, as he or she gains experience in home sales, home purchases, closings and other real estate activities, they may take the additional classes and exams to obtain their broker’s license.  Once they have that license they can open their own brokerage and hire realtors.  Typically, the realtor splits part of his or her commission with the broker.

Disclaimer:

The material on our website is intended to provide only general information and comments as a courtesy to the general public and potential real estate clients. Although we make our best efforts to ensure that the information found on our website is accurate and timely, we cannot, and do not, guarantee that the information is either. Nor do we guarantee the accuracy of any information contained on websites to which our website provide links.

Do not, under any circumstances, rely on information found on our website as a replacement for sound professional advice from individuals who specialize in such matters. Legal, insurance, and other related subjects are often complicated. For assistance with your specific real estate questions or inquiries please contact one of our knowledgeable real estate agents, any of whom will be pleased to determine whether our agency can assist you.

Make no mistake about. ...

Why Do I Need A Realtor When Buying a Home?

Make no mistake about.  When you are trying to buy a home for sale, you—the buyer—are ultimately responsible for making offers and either accepting or rejecting counter offers.  However, the realtor does help in the negotiation process.  Quite a bit, in fact.

Most importantly, the realtor will help you to decide what a reasonable offer is.  The realtor will have access to recent sales (i.e. “comps”), the appraised price of the property and the overall state of the market.

The realtor will also serve as the intermediary between you and the owner of the home for sale.  This may not sound like much, but a negotiation is much easier to do when the two concerned parties are not face to face in an adversarial situation.  Whether you want to lowball, hang tough or throw up your hands and give in, it helps to not have the object of your struggle sitting across the table from you.  It keeps the emotions out of the way.

Disclaimer:

The material on our website is intended to provide only general information and comments as a courtesy to the general public and potential real estate clients. Although we make our best efforts to ensure that the information found on our website is accurate and timely, we cannot, and do not, guarantee that the information is either. Nor do we guarantee the accuracy of any information contained on websites to which our website provide links.

Do not, under any circumstances, rely on information found on our website as a replacement for sound professional advice from individuals who specialize in such matters. Legal, insurance, and other related subjects are often complicated. For assistance with your specific real estate questions or inquiries please contact one of our knowledgeable real estate agents, any of whom will be pleased to determine whether our agency can assist you.

In the old days,...

Should I Market/Sell my home myself?

In the old days, selling a house was easy.  The owner of the house for sale stuck a sign up in the front yard and waited for a knock on the door.  I tried that once.  After a year of prank calls I signed with a realtor and the house sold two months later—at a good price, too.  Although we are biased, it is not recommended that you try to sell your home yourself.

There are also publications that will print a photo and a short description of your home for sale.  They are usually found near the entrances of supermarkets.  Ever see anybody actually pick one up?

Fizz-Bo.  Kind of sounds like a cross between a carbonated beverage and an old rock ‘n’ roll icon.  What it actually is, though, is the phonetic pronunciation of the acronym “FSBO”—which stands for “For Sale By Owner.”  Most FSBO sellers either have no access at all to the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) or go through a third-party service (for a fee) to get their property listed.

Do yourself a favor.  Go see a realtor and take advantage of their skills, sales prowess and market expertise.

Disclaimer:

The material on our website is intended to provide only general information and comments as a courtesy to the general public and potential real estate clients. Although we make our best efforts to ensure that the information found on our website is accurate and timely, we cannot, and do not, guarantee that the information is either. Nor do we guarantee the accuracy of any information contained on websites to which our website provide links.

Do not, under any circumstances, rely on information found on our website as a replacement for sound professional advice from individuals who specialize in such matters. Legal, insurance, and other related subjects are often complicated. For assistance with your specific real estate questions or inquiries please contact one of our knowledgeable real estate agents, any of whom will be pleased to determine whether our agency can assist you.

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